Jump to content

Welcome to Da WAAAGH
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

101 Compilation


  • Please log in to reply
100 replies to this topic

#1
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Choppas
Chapter 1 - Modifying Da Choppas
Chapter 2 - "IF I had a hammer, I'd hammer in da mornin'"
Chapter 3 - Da Bitz Box Raid
Chapter 4 - Da 'ol Ball An Chain
Chapter 5 - Plasticard Is Your Friend
Chapter 6 - Da Sneaky Choppas

Bioniks
Chapter 1 - It´z only wun chapter

Burnas
Chapter 1 - First The Burna
Chapter 2 - Then The Backpack

Grotblastas
Chapter 1 - It´z only wun chapter again

Kustom Jobs
Chapter 1 - Da base
Chapter 2 - Shootier v.1
Chapter 3 - Shootier v.2
Chapter 4 - Blasta
Chapter 5 - More Dakka


Now With Bonus Material
alexthegolem: Cut and Glue 101

Biv: Kans 101

Da Goff Rokker: Scratchbuilding Engines 101

Gashbad: KWIK AND EASY ROKKITZ!

KingNic: Dynamic Orks 101
KingNic: Armour Plates 101
KingNic: Modernising Ork Bikes
KingNic: Fixing Trukk Drivers

Krooza: Dethrolla 101

Krysath: Kustom Rokkit Pack 101

not_themilkybarkid: Building a Better Vanquisher

Scarpia: Burna WiP´s

Totgeboren: Killakans Cheap and Easy

#2
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Modifying Da Choppas

You have two options:
1. Modify the exsisting weapons.
2. Make new ones.

First, lets start with modifying what you have. This is, obviously, the most simple to do.

Lets start with a choppa from the fantasy Sprue:
Posted Image
This is a simple, four step midification that makes a totally different and more modern looking choppa.

1. Sand off the details, they will only get in the way.
2. You need really thin plasticard...really thin. Cut the three pieces like this:
Posted Image
And glue them on like in the first pic. The strip goes on the back.
3. Add rivets.
4. Cut off the spike from the handle (throw the spike into your bits box.)


Here is seven variations of the same choppa.

Posted Image

A. This is the choppa before modifications.
B. This is a simple change of profile. Just carefully us a knife to carve out the back.
C. Another change of profile that makes the choppa look nasty. Do the strait cuts first, then the angle. Be very careful doing this, it could be a finger killer. Really thin files will give you a similar effect.
D. This just has the details shaved off. More of a base for the next three.
E. The groove. This is the simplest form. All sorts of designs can be carved. Use a ruler and thin pen to draw a strait line on the choppa. Use your pin vice to drill a hole at each end. Now drill holes along the line. When most of the material is removed, use a hobby knife or thin file to remove the rest of the material.
F. Serrated edge on the front. A favorite of skarboys. Done the same as the other serrates.
G. This is done just like the last post. I just used two big rivits instead of lots of little ones.

Here are some scans of choppas I (Biv) did for my burna boy squad.
They follow the first method for the most part with some extra carving and bits on some. Something I forgot to add is that the back strip should go on first. It can be sanded to the size of the choppa and the sides lay flush.
This one is pretty standard. A little carving on the top. Also check out the little armor plate on the arm that all my burna boys will have:

Posted Image

This one had the wooden hilt sanded down and then capped to look like metal:

Posted Image

This on is my favorite. Notice the carving.:

Posted Image

#3
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
"IF I had a hammer, I'd hammer in da mornin'"

Wot Yous need:
1. Plasticard, about shoulder pad thickness.
2. The tip of the canister shooter. You know, this:
Posted Image
3. Strong rod of some sort. The handle of a choppa would work and keeps you from having to put the weapon in a hand. Spear shafts work well. Copper rod is your best choice.
4. The spikey bit from the fantasy sprue. Any other spikey thing will work as well. The spikey shoulder pad from the space ork sprue is good.
5. Metal sewing pins. The kind with the curved top, not the plastic balls.

Here is what it will look like:
Posted Image
Assembly is pretty simple.

1. Cut two equal sized pieces of card, just a little bigger than the shooter tip. Glue them together. Let dry.
2. Get your pin vice and a very thin bit. Drill six, evenly spaced holes in the plasticard. Don't drill all the way through.
3. Take six of the sewing pins. Make sure the heads of each are molded well. Sometimes they look like crap. Use snips (and safety goggles) to snip off most of the pin, leave just a little tab. Put glue on the tab and insert the pins into each hole. Tweezers are your friend here.
4. Get the tip of the shooter and sand both sides flat. Turn it over so the old bottom is now the top.
5. Drill a hole in what is now the bottom the same size as the rod you are using as a handle.
6. Glue in the handle.
7. Glue the spikey bit to the back.
8. Center and glue the plasticard assembly to the front.
9. Put your new hammer on the ork of your choice.

#4
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Da Bitz Box Raid

This actually uses the same basic premise as the hammer. The idea is to use bitz to create new weapons.

Here is my first example:

Posted Image

I had the hand but had cut off most of the axe for another project. The rest of the bitz are just random including sprue pieces from an ard boys shoulder pad sprue, a megablocks weapon handle, part of a mad dok saw, and a plastic fiddly bit on the tip.
I made a wad of green stuff and just stuck everything on. I pulled off the bits when the GS is dry and glued them back on to make sure they were secure. I could have used the superglue while the greenstuff was wet for the superbond...but I was dumb and forgot.
The tip of a penny nail was glued into the handle.

Posted Image

This started as a piece of plasticard that was sanded down to an edge. Then grooves were sanded into the edge for effect (take a look at fantasy choppas)

It's hard to see, but I added an extra, thin piece of card like in the first post in this thread and have used clear shirt type putty to create rivits. A generic, plastic Q-tip stem with a thin piece of rod inserted inside was used to extand the handle.

You know how you always have GS left over? Roll what is left into really thin...er...rolls. I chop this up to use as rivits, as you see here. The rivits are attached to really thin card that has been bent around the handle shaft. Glue one side and let it dry. Then wrap the card around and glue the other side.

#5
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Da 'ol Ball An Chain

Wot you need:
1. Some sort of modeling chain. You can get it from hobby stores or you can use the fake jewelry type, though it doesn't look as good. Twisted wire could also work and gives a little different effect.
2. Green stuff or another gap fill. Don't worry, no sculpting skill will be needed.
3. An axe choppa arm like these:

Posted Image

4. Some sort of ball, spikey or otherwise. I took mine off of a weapon from a Megabloks Knights set.
5. Some sort of bit to cap the bottom of the handle. Once again, I can thank Megabloks.

Here is what I came up with

Posted Image

1. Remove the axe head from the handle, save for something else.
2. Drill a hole in the top of the handle.
3. Drill a hole in the ball.
4. Now this is the tricky part. You want the chain long enough so the ball rests on the arm. This is so the final weapon will be sturdy.
5. Glue the chain into the handle and the ball.
6. Get the chain to lay the way you like and make sure it's taught...er... no slack. Glue the ball to the side of the arm.
7. Use the Green Stuff or other filler to fill the holes the chain was inserted into the rest of the way.
8. Glue on the handle cap.
9. El Done-o.

There is tons of variation on this. Multiple chains, a cog could be used on a mek's B&C, a random piece of scrap instead of the ball (perhaps with the tips of finish nails or push tack sticking out), or whatever else you can think of.

#6
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Plasticard Is Your Friend

Get lots of it in lots of thicknesses. Glue it togther, sand edges on it. Make hammers, axes, swords and blades without names. Add rivits for orky goodness.
I'd get copper rod at the same time, just to make them sturdy. Though spear shafts will work for handles and will take a pin.

Posted Image

Use your imagination with the shapes of the weapons. If a bit might be useful, use it. Orks cobble equipment together from what they find on the battlefield so anything goes. Got a Nid claw? Ram a handle through it. Khorne lost his pretty axe? It's yours now. Looks like that rhino hatch with the imp eagle on it can be sanded into an axe to me. And all them spikes from the spikey tank could easily be attached to a block of wood or metal. It doesn't have to be pretty, just killy.

#7
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Da Sneaky Choppas

First ask yourself, what does a sneaky choppa look like? Interesting question huh? I have several ideas on what is sneaky. First the obvious, the knife bit.

Posted Image

Use the first method in this article to beef it up. In fact, any of the methods can be used on the little knife.

The wrist claw frees up the hands for sneaking and tracking while still being choppy:

Posted Image
I found this bit in a model train shop. Yes, it's a garden rake. I cut the handle off, flipped it over and glued it back together. I then glued it to the arm and wrapped it in string, slathered in glue.

The next five are all in one pic

A. and B. Ninja weapons are very sneaky. Use my method for the ball and chain but use a second rod instead to make nunchucks. Add spikes or blades to the end of the chucks to make them more choppy.
The simple bow staff (B1) is a sneaky staple, but not killy enough. Add spikes to the tips (B2), blades like a pole-arm (B3) or big wieghts (B4) or a combination (B5) to give it what you need to make it killy.

C. The next three are plasticard creations. The first could be flipped over and used as a normal choppa. The hooked tip, upside down position and guard on the handle all give it a sneakier feel.

D. This is called a punch dagger. It was often used by thieves to counteract the power of a sword without having to hold a bulky weapon. In our case, the blade can be any shape, and bigger is better.

E. This is another dagger type weapon. The point of this is to note the little blades on the sides. Ninja, thieves and anyone who used stealth and skill to overpower larger opponents would use those side blades to entangle swords and the like.

Posted Image

Other details you can add to your sneaky weapons are hooks, barbs, serrates (especially on knife type weapons) and blood grooves.

What is a blood groove? Well this is:

Posted Image

It's use? Just like it sounds. It would channel the blood down the blade and away from your hand so you didn't lose the weapon and could continue to do delicate work. For our uses, is just looks cool. The easiest way to make one is to use a pin vice to make slight holes at either end of the groove. Don't go all the way through, unless you want to. Charve a channel with a hobby knife till the channel is close and then use a thin, round file to smooth it all out. This may be the hardest thing to do that I have shown you in this article, so don't crump yourself if it gives you fits.

#8
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Bee-oniks
As far as modeling is concerned there are 2 types of bioniks. Internal and external. For orks, since ork tech is supposed to be crude looking, we concentrate on the external.

Now, for the pistons on an arm, there are also two schools of thought.
Please note that my pics are, in no way, to be considered in scale

Posted Image

Example A shows a two piston system. The upper arm piston actually moves the arm at the shoulder joint, the lower piston bends the elbow.

Example B shows a on piston system. The mechanics for the shoulder are implied to be internal or part of the shoulder so you only need the one big piston for the elbow.

Of course, this is just the most basic. A piston can be added to the wrist, pistons can be doubled on the joint to add detail and you will want to run some sort of cables or wires.


Some things you will need for the way I do this:
1. Some bulky plastic rod or I-beam or other solid plasticard to serve as the meat of the arm. These can even be looted from toys or other minis if you want stuff with pre-made detail. But square rod would work just fine.
2. Plastic, generic Q-tip (cotton swab) stems. They are plastic, they are hollow, they are good. Be sure to wash them with soap and water before using to remove the molding oils. You can also use hollow plastic rod, but this is cheaper.
3. Thin platic rod or thick paperclips. The rod is better and one of the few places I would encourage spending the money. It's good to work with quality materials when the scale gets so small. You want the rod to fit inside the Q-tip stems.
4. 1 Bic pen.
5. Random plastic bits. Either chunks of sprue or little pieces of "ork shoulder pad" thickness plasticard.
6. Something to use as a hand (chain choppas and sluggas are both proppa).
7. Paperclips for pinning.

Step 1.
Cut two equal potions of the Bic pen. These should be about the same width as the widest part of an ork shoota. These are the shoulder and elbow.

Step 2.
Trim the "mass material" for the upper and lower arm to shape. Use your pin pise to drill pining holes in the shoulder and elbow joints and matching holes where the arm bits will connect. Pin and glue (see pic).

Posted Image

As for the arm size, I'd make the arm wider than the pistons, though there is a way around it which I will get to later

Now you have the basic arm, time to make it move.

Step 3.
The pistons are simple enough to make. Cut the Q-tip to the proper size, cut the small plastic rod to the proppa size and put them together. Two hints. first, always make the small rod too long. Better to need to trim it than have it be too small. The second hint is not to glue these yet. That way adjustments can still be made.

Step 4.
The next step it the piston mounts. There are two ways to do this.

I prefer type "A" which is two bits of card cut to an identical shape. I like to use my pin vice to drill a hole through the bracket and the piston and then run a thin wire between them this is the in the pic. I also prefer to cut out all the bits and wire them together before gluing. That way I can adjust the piston spread and placement of the brackets on the fly, figure out where they need to be, and then glue it all together at once.

The second method doesn't look as good, but is easier to pull off. Just cut a little piece of sprue and then use you knife to CAREFULLY cut a groove into the top of the sprue. The piston will rest in the groove. You can either leave it as is or cover the top somehow.
Method "A" is really much better.

Posted Image

In these two pics you can see how they look with the piston in place

Posted Image

And here is an alternative way to mount the brackets. Notice the spacers. You can flip this concept over if you would like another way to attach the brackets when the piston is smaller as well.

Posted Image

One other way, that is difficult and could require some boiling water to bend the plastic, is to make the bracket all one piece, heat it up and wrap it around the arm. Once again, hard to do, but it would look cool.

Step 5
Now the fun part, the hand. Look in your bits box. See that cool bit with either the shooty or choppy end on it? Grap it, chop off the handle, and pin that bad boy on the end. Done with the hand.

Step 6:
Details. This one is pretty much up to you. Wires, guitar string cables, NS style cables, Really thin plasticard or cardboard to make metal plates and panel lids. Random circles for detail. Don´t forget rivets and the bolt heads at the pistons and elbow joints.

You do need to find a way to fill/cover the big holes in the shoulder and elbow. I suggest green stuff and even more GS to smooth out all the connections.


These basic principles work on legs too so play around a little.

#9
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
First the burna.

What you will need:
1. The shoota with the drum magazine. You can use other shootas but they are a little harder and require extra tubes and tanks.
2. Either a stem from a PLASTIC, generic cotton swab (Q-tip) or styrene tube the same size.
3. Either a paperclip (coated or non) or a styrene rod of the same size.
One piece of sprue.
4. A random bit (see the pic) can be anything, of any shape, that makes sense and fits there.
5. The choppa with the rounded tip and two bolts

Posted Image

1. Cut off the barrel of the shoota. Throw the barrel into your bits box.
2. CAREFULLY cut off the handle (like and ork is going to hold it...which he is)and SAVE IT. You will need it.
3. Cut equal lengths of the Swab/Q-tip stem and paperclip.
4. Cut off the axe part of the choppa, this is the new nozzle. Cut a piece of sprue in the same proportion as the diagram and glue the “Big” side to the choppa
5. Glue the random bit into the "notch" of the burna tip. Let dry.
6. Drill appropriate size holes where the barrel of the shooter was and into the sprue thing. You may also want to drill little holes on the upper portion of the burna tip for vent holes (see other burna pics).
7. Drill a hole in the front, top portion of the burna tip.
8. Glue the stem and paperclip into the burna tip. Let dry or glue into the shoota as well.
9. Cut a small piece of the Q-tip stem and glue into front hole (see diagram)
10. Glue the shoota handle into place on the tip (see diagram)
11. This is not on the diagram, but drill a hole into the back of the drum magazine.

There you go, the gun part is done but there are some other designs

Posted Image

A. The lower rod has been replaced by some sort of hose. The double sprue handle was also added and vent holes were put in the new spot

Posted Image

B. A more complex piece placed to hold everything together. Vent holes in vet another spot. Used a little piece or rod instead of a shoota handle.

Posted Image

C. The two types of handle have been combined here by shaving a little off the sides of the sprue. New vent holes as well. Also replaced the handle with the rod.

Posted Image

D. This combines various elements of the other four. Also note the rivets placed on the random bit.

#10
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Then the backpack

Bitz that you need:

Posted Image

1. A bic pen (throw away the guts, sand off any writing)
2. Four plastic push tacks
3. A little square of plasticard
4. A small piece of coated paperclip (could be left over from the burna)
5. Something to use for pinning.


Step by step:

1. Wash everything with handsoap and water to removemolding grease. The stuff you are using here has alot of it.
2. Cut the pen into two equal lengths, avoid any holes or tapers(angles)in the pen.
3. Into the sides of each pen piece, drill holes for pinning. Remember to get them matched up and uncoated paperclips make great "pins".
4. Pin and glue the two pieces togather NOTE: Bic pens don't like to glue so the pinning is absolutely neccesary!!!
5. Use clippers or a small saw to cut the little tips off of the push tacks as shown in the diagram. Save the pin part of the tack for another project or thown them away. Don't lose them in the carpet (ouch!)
6. Glue the part you just cut off into the pens to "cap" them. The nasty looking clipped part goes inside the pen.


7. OPTIONAL: I filled the pens with elmers glue (PVA) after I glued on the bottom caps. This was to make sure all the pins would stay in place. You can probably get away with not doing this, but if you have the glue it doesn't hurt. It does take a long time for the elmers to dry though...And there are other considerations (see step 11)
8. Drill holes into the center of the top caps.
9. Bend the coated paperclip and glue the ends into the holes.
10. Glue the little square of plasticard onto the center of the backpack. Decorate as desired.
11. This is not on the diagram. You will want to drill a hole on the same side of the tank as the arm that will be holding the burna. If you are doing the elmers thing you may want to do step 11 and 12 before step 8.
12. Get some sort of thick, bendable wire, guitar string or wire wrapped onto itself in a coil to use as a fuel tube between the backpack and burna. Glue one end of this into the hole in the side of the tank and the other into the hole you drilled into the back of the drum magazine. You may want to wait till the ork is assembled before attaching the tube to the burna.

Here is another version of the backpack. Started by turning it sideways. Pretty self explanitory.

Posted Image

And that's it! Modify the design at will and enjoy.

#11
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Wot! no title

What you will need is some plasticard about the same thickness as an ork shoulder pad, some plasticard about half that thick, and some really thin plastic (really thin). You can also use strip styrene in the size you need and just chop off the pieces for mass production. I use it to make shoulder pads and you can do a similar thing here.

First, there is no set rule to this, so use your imagination. What I'm giving you here is just a foundation to build on.

Look at the first of the two pics. Decide how big you want the blastas to be (if you are looking at the side) and cut out three pieces that size. Glue them together and let dry. You may have to sand a little to smooth the edges. Now find a plastic tube to use as a barrel (I use Q-tip stems) and drill an appropriate size hole.
Now glue the tube in.

This is the basic gun, ready for details:

Posted Image

Now look at the second pic. A bit more detailed of a gun. Glue two pieces together instead of three and use the half thickness plasticard for the wraparounds. The rivets are really thin tube, rolled gs or globs of gs.

Posted Image

Now look at an ork slugga. See those slightly raised rectangle panels and glyphs?
That is why you have the final, really thin card. Just cut out details as you see fit and glue them on.

Check out all the human and ork weapons for inspiration and think of other variables. For example, you could drill the hole really deep then cut a notch out of the top front of the blasta. This would expose more of the barrel when you glue it in and ad variety.

This is also a source of unique guns for da boyz as well

Here is an example. This is actually slugga sized, so it's not exactly the same, but it uses the same principles.

Posted Image

#12
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Posted Image

#13
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Posted Image

#14
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Posted Image

#15
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Posted Image

#16
BiRELL

BiRELL

    Stormboy

  • Speed Freaks
  • 1,393 posts
  • Location:The northern wastelands of sweden
  • Army Name:Da ´Eabuttas.
Posted Image

#17
Socaddict

Socaddict

    Stainless Steel Skull

  • Boyz
  • 583 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Army Name:WAAAGH - Grimbad
Kan 101

Just putting it up here.

#18
Scarpia

Scarpia

    No Gud Lootin' Git!

  • Deathskullz
  • 5,709 posts
  • Army Name:Warboss Bobz Killa Konvitkz
Biv did such a nice job on this :cheers that I wanted to post up some "real" wip shots of my take on his fantastic design.

These are actually very easy to make.

Start by cutting off the barrel of a shoota.

Posted Image

Than cut off the magazine

Posted Image

than cut the choppa off of a boy arm, and remove the majority of the blade. I like this spikey one, and I found a little of the blade helps later on.

Posted Image

Next, a small piece of plasticard goes on the shoota. I used both round and square stock.

Posted Image

for model strenght, I pinned the barrel to the shoota, starting off with drilling a small hole in the center of the plasticard, and inserting a length of paperclip.

Posted Image

drilling a hole in the choppa handle is a bit more work, but if you start the hole with the blade of a sharpe knife, and work carefully, it's not too bad.

Posted Image

finally, I trim down the paper clip, align the barrel, and glue it up.

Posted Image
meh.

#19
Scarpia

Scarpia

    No Gud Lootin' Git!

  • Deathskullz
  • 5,709 posts
  • Army Name:Warboss Bobz Killa Konvitkz
next up is the lower feed tube. Simply bend more paperclip to a pleasing shpe. What you don't see here is the hole drilled into the shoota, just below the white block, that one end of the paperclip slides into.

Posted Image

The paperclip gets glued in, and than another small piece of plasticard attaches to the end of the choppa/barrel, and the other side of the paperclip goes in that.

Posted Image

Finally, the handle of the shoota is cut off, and moved to the front at an angle. I do this last so I won't loose that small part. Don't forget to drill a hole in both the handle and the barrell as well!

Posted Image

by varying the shape of the plasticard, the choppa, and other fun parts, you can easily make a variety of unique burnaz for your boyz. Here are three that I made for my scarboyz, all WIP.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image
meh.

#20
KingNic

KingNic

    Stainless Steel Skull

  • Speed Freaks
  • 575 posts
  • Location:Leeds/Wakefield, UK
Dynamic Orks 101
By KingNic

Our standard plastic boy is still a fairly nice piece of kit. Unfortunately, there IS only a limited number of combinations, and even fewer poses that we can make. I've started a new Speed Freaks army, and I've been trying to make the boyz a little more dynamic. Here's a quick tutorial.

These are the bits I've selected to make the boy.
Posted Image

Right, I've already got enough boys with the arms depicted, so I'm going to do a few weapon swaps. First, with the two left arms I've got, I cut off the wrists, like so:
Posted Image

Stick the arms on the opposite wrists.
If you're gonna do this, try and do it with arms that have something on the wrist to mask the join.

I did the same with the right arm - cut off the hands at the wrist and swapped them. Before I glue the slugga arm back on though, I want to make a little modification.

Take the slugga wrist and a shoota, and cut them up as shown:
Posted Image

Stick the end shoota barrel onto the slugga, and the slugga end onto the shoota. Discard the middle shoota part. You should now have a nice slugga and another beefy slugga/little shoota, like so:
Posted Image

Now take the slugga arm and make an angled cut at the top of the arm, like so:
Posted Image

You can flip the cut-off round and stick it to the arm-body join, to make it a little flatter, like so:
Posted Image

You will probably need to file this down somewhat.

This will make the arm have a bit more of an angle against the body, rather than just being flat by the side.

I screwed up a little bit with the cut on the left arm, and ended up with this:
Posted Image

With a little filing and green stuff, it should be ok.

I didn't take any pictures of the next stage I'm afraid. Next I took 2 pairs of legs - one going to the left, one going to the right. I cut off the feet of both legs at the ankles (where the boot meets the trousers) and swapped over the left feet, and then the right feet. This will give you a running pose. The pose will have the Ork tipped a little too far forward, so file, cut and green stuff away until you have a more upright pose. If all goes well, you should end up with something like this:
Posted Image