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Da Orko Maliss


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44 replies to this topic

#41
greggles

greggles

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My technique is easy, just very time consuming.  It's also one of those things that looks horrible till the end haha.  Get yourself some weathering powders, so simple and you can apply on finished models without worry!



#42
Badfang Brassaxe

Badfang Brassaxe

    Looted Russ Gunner

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Cheers for the response, I've had a whole raft of weathering powders for years 'tho I haven't touched them in a while now - bought them when I was building Smoggy many years ago http://www.the-waaag...=46831&p=623666 , couldn't get them to behave as I wanted them to and despite reading all the books I could get hold of and a couple of DVD tutorials..... there seems to be some sort of disconnect somewhere :crybaby



#43
greggles

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Just dab them on like makeup!  Get fluffy brushes!  Smoggy looks great! What are you worried about? Get dat weathing on there boss! Have fun with it!


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#44
Badfang Brassaxe

Badfang Brassaxe

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Cheers Greggles, a bit of a late response but I was having a bit of a 'discussion' with someone who didn't believe me when I said yellow was only 'half' a primary colour - for pigments it is but when it comes to light it isn't (the old CRT monitors only had red,green and blue emitters (guns) and the chances are that LCD screens only have red, green and blue diodes - yellow is mixed by firing red and green light simultaneously). Which got me wondering if the reason that yellow and rust looks good whereas rust and any other colour just looks 'mucky' is because red and green light makes yellow but red and green paint makes brahn  :? They're sort of the same colour. Weird :lol



#45
Giganotosaurus

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Science that everyone knows, but may have forgotten about: Light and pigments are two different things. The color of light is created by the wavelength of the light. White light is all the wavelengths of light together. When it comes to light, black means there is no light ("black light" is a name for light bulbs that emit ultra violet light which the human eye cannot see, but we can see its effects). Color/pigment is created by the absorption of all light except for the one you are seeing. White objects reflect all light, and absorb no light. Black objects reflect no light, and absorb all light. Yellow objects absorb all the wavelengths except for yellow light. If you mix all the different pigments together, you get a brownish black. As you said Badfang; weird. :? Back to the "hot" (red, orange, yellow), and "cool" (blue, purple, and believe it or not white) color subject. Rust looks good with yellow, they are complimentary. Rust can look good with blue (especially a lighter blue), but the rust, a hot color, is what stands out. Tone, the intensity of a color, has a lot to do with this as well. Greggles uses a softer yellow paired with an intense rust scheme, a great color/tone combination.  :love  I am sure that information online can explain it far better than I just did, and is worth seeking out to understand how color works.  :yes   


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