IPB



Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Review: "How to Paint Citadel Miniatures" 2012, Looking at the new book
Agatheron
post Apr 8 2012, 06:43 PM
Post #1


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



I was able to get my hands on the new "How to Paint" book a few days early, so I've had a bit of time to digest it, watch the DVD, and to try out some of the new paints. So here's my take on the miniatures book. I tend to be an optimistic person, and as such, I tend to look for the positives in almost anything. I suppose if that makes me a fanboy, then take it for what it is, however, I don't see myself as such. Optimistic, yes, fanboy no. This is also a review of the book, but to a lesser extent the new paints... and in many respects, the new book is inseparable from the new paints.

I happen to have both previous versions of the "How to Paint Citadel Miniatures" and as such, this review will be comparing this to previous editions.

What you get:
The book itself is a semi-hardbound 136 page coil book. The back cover folds out into a triangle to allow the book to be stood up at any page and read. Since many of the pages have their bottom facing to the outer page, much of the book is intended to be read with the fold out cover. In addition, there is a DVD included. More on that later.

Contents:
Section 1 talks about techniques, with different chapters on the different techniques, but also how they're used with the new paint line. After the introduction and preparation, there is a chapter each on Basecoating, Washing (Shades), Drybrushing, Layering, Glazing, Basing (Textures), and other Techniques. All of these chapters are mirrored on the DVD if you want to see how it looks actually being done.

I should say that there's a difference between "Basecoating" and "Undercoating." Undercoating is the application of Primer, either spray or brush on, and either Skull White or Chaos Black (the spray primer names have not changed). I have seen people bring models into a store saying they're "basecoating" where in fact they've simply been "undercoated." It appears that in future conversations using the term "basecoat" means the first application of colour(s) after the model has been undercoated.

The preparation chapter, I think, has the potential to be overlooked. I'd advise against it, because it includes things like troubleshooting when the primer doesn't seem to be working properly. It's worth the look.

The chapter on Basecoating is pretty straightforward, but it also has information on using the Spray gun as well. As someone who uses an airbrush, that's enough to show me that the base paints at least will also work well through an airbrush. It's not always guaranteed, as I found out with Vallejo model colour and airbrush thinners... puke.gif The base paints take the place of the previous Foundation line, with the selection expanding from 18 to 34... including both (Ceramite) White and (Abaddon) Black, and four metallics. The paints aren't just designed to cover surfaces, but they are designed to be painted over by other colours. Examples are given for both applying these with a brush and spraying them on. With the spray gun, it also includes how to create camo schemes using the Spray gun. This, of course, can be refined more with an airbrush, but since Citadel only produces the basic spray gun, the book is limited in this regard. Even so, using the spray gun or airbrush to give a jump start to your army has the potential to be much more common than before, as becomes evident in the army examples provided.

Curiously enough, Base paints are the only "First" sequence that needs to remain in this order. The next chapters are Shades, Drybrushing and Layers in that order, but the book makes it clear that you are not tied to that particular order. Using the technique that best suits what you're working on is much more important... although it does mention that Drybrushing is often best applied before layers as it can be a messy process... but the chief thing is to use what is best for the circumstance and not be married to a particular order. This is made clear in a small part of the book, but the suggested colour sequences may seem like a rigid prescription.

The Chapter on Washes (Shades) gives a few examples of how they work. While you can slather the washes on, they also suggest that you don't want to put too much on because the excess will simply run off and is effectively wasted. They include section washing, all over washing, and my favourite was the example of Casandora Yellow over Ceramite White. First 2-step yellow over black that I've seen.

The Drybrushing chapter is pretty straightforward as well, but with a dedicated line of Drybrushing "Compounds" as they're calling it, it takes the guesswork out of it. They're not really paints, but pigments in a type of thick paste. These aren't to be watered down. Don't stick a wet brush into the pot! The three examples they use are ones that we've used on models for some time. Bone, Fur, Armour, and vehicles. It works. They also get used later when painting the textures on a base's models. While the dry compounds are new, there's nothing really new in this chapter.

Like the Drybrushing chapter, I found the layering chapter to be basically what I already know. It's informative, although to be honest, I found it more helpful to watch this part on the DVD than to simply read it. That having been said, one of the examples given in the chapter was NOT using a Drybrush Compound.

Since the Glazes are new to the GW line as is the technique, I was curious to see how they work. In military modelling terms they're sometimes called "filters." Although the GW glazes are far stronger than a filter. They are similar in many ways to the shades, but they will dry where you apply them. The book gives several examples of how to use them effectively, and is also points out that these will dry where they are applied and won't flow into the cracks of a given model. Since there's only four glaze colours (the 3 primary colours, 1 green), think of them as "tinting" an existing paint job to give it some unity or muting something that's been over-highlighted. As someone who has over-highlighted stuff in the past, this is a good thing. That having been said, I don't have any of the glazes in my personal library yet. I have at least one of every other category so far.

I'm excited by the Textures, if for no other reason it will greatly reduce the time it takes to base my models. The examples are clear cut, and the textures can be shaded or drybrushed or both. It shows that the textures can also be watered down during application to help them cover the bases better. Just don't expect to drybrush them immediately after application, you do need to let them dry. Again, the video examples on this are much better than simply what's in the book.

The last chapter before the army examples is "Other Techniques" which includes trasnfer/decal application, which is helpful if you're not familiar with them. Since I applied decals to the 95% of the surface area of a 3' long model, I didn't learn anything new from this smilingOrk.gif However, they do cover chipping, rust, verdigris, as well as how to combine techniques for various effects. There's also reminders that lots can be done with batch painting.

After the first 52 pages, they then give examples on eight army projects. I won't write a separate section here, but I found these to be very informative in terms of how to essentially mass-paint armies. For one example, the Orc & Goblin army presented begins with a Chaos Black undercoat, and then all the models in the army are sprayed with Dryad Bark... and then the remaining base paints are applied over it. The end result looks good. The skin used in the Orc example is a Waaagh! Flesh Basecoat, a Wash of Biel-Tan Green, and two layers of Warboss Green and Skarsnik Green.

I have more details to add, but unfortunately I've run out of time and I have a supper engagment that I must leave for now. When I get back, I'll include my comments and criticisms of the book as a whole...





--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
warbosssean
post Apr 8 2012, 10:35 PM
Post #2


da thread digga
Group Icon

Group: Freebooterz
Posts: 2,846
Joined: 11-July 03
From: melbourne, australia
Member No.: 45



Haha, way to leave us hanging
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agatheron
post Apr 8 2012, 10:54 PM
Post #3


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



Easter dinner called mid-review, so I apologize. Well... not exactly mid-review, about 3/4 of the way through it.

The first 52 pages of the book is about techniques, specifically techniques centred around getting familiar with the new line of paints, and the processes involved with them. The remaining pages of the book are devoted to Army Projects. The pages use these techniques, but also provide examples and highlight certain ways of doing things. Even if you don't paint any of the armies in the book, the examples are all transferrable. The Army Projects present in the book are Tyranids (Kraken), Orcs & Goblins, Haradrim, Empire (Reikland), beakies (Aurora Chapter), Tomb Kings, Gondor (Minas Tirith), and Dark panzee. Basically 3 WHFB, 3 40K and 2 LoTR. The DVD only provides video coverage of the Aurora Beakies and the Kraken Tyranids.

I mentioned that in the last post the Orc and Goblin army are sprayed with a basecoat first. This technique is true for the Orcs & Goblins, Empire, Aurora Beakies, and essentially the Tyranid Army as well. Curiously enough, the Khemri Army isn't sprayed, but I don't see why you otherwise wouldn't. Either way, the techniques shown here make for what certainly appears to be fast army painting.

The last few pages of the book is a colour guide that gives suggestions for various common colours or common units. However, you can use as many of the suggestions as you want. For example, Ork Skin on these last 2 pages suggests Waaagh! Flesh base, Biel-Tan Green Shade wash, Warboss Green layer, Skarsnik Green layer... all of which are in the above example... but it also suggests Underhive Ash as the drybrush colour for Ork skin. So perhaps a combination of suggestions one can try.

I expect that these are starting guidelines, but people can develop their own tricks for what paints to use for Base, Wash, Layer etc... and even in what order.

All told, this is a good beginner and intermediate book. This is not an 'eavy Metal Masterclass book, and I am very interested to see how the 'eavy Metal Masterclass articles develop with the new paints. If this gets people to put painted armies down on the table, then it certainly has done its job.


--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Trogdar
post Apr 8 2012, 11:26 PM
Post #4


Grot Oiler


Group: Boyz
Posts: 168
Joined: 18-April 09
From: Seattle Area
Member No.: 10,145



"They include section washing, all over washing, and my favourite was the example of Casandora Yellow over Ceramite White. First 2-step yellow over black that I've seen."

So the white went over the black in one coat and the wash resulted in a good looking yellow?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agatheron
post Apr 8 2012, 11:31 PM
Post #5


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



QUOTE (Trogdar @ Apr 8 2012, 10:26 PM) *
"They include section washing, all over washing, and my favourite was the example of Casandora Yellow over Ceramite White. First 2-step yellow over black that I've seen."

So the white went over the black in one coat and the wash resulted in a good looking yellow?


To be safe, I'd do 2 coats of white, but it dries quick enough that you can make a second application before moving on to a second miniature. As for the Shade, a single wash is sufficient, but a second one could also benefit the model depending on what you're trying to do.


--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Shadey
post Apr 8 2012, 11:40 PM
Post #6


telescoping arm


Group: Boyz
Posts: 505
Joined: 5-May 06
Member No.: 2,474



Interesting. Without trying to go into 'that' argument, I have seriously restricted my GW purchases for a few years now because I am not happy with them but this review is making me consider an exception. Thought at this point I should also say a plan for a giant battlewagon using two baneblades is also tempting to make a mockery of my moral indignation. pphhtork.gif

As a side note (non Ork related but interesting and amusing) one or two of Chapterhouse Studio's stuff is actually selling the Storm Raven for me more than anything GW did, which is a third exception).

Thank you for taking the time.

I am especially interested in how the dvd compliments the book. Certain things communciate better from 'seeing them in person' so to speak, as oppossed to reading about them (which also have their place).
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
warbosssean
post Apr 9 2012, 09:06 AM
Post #7


da thread digga
Group Icon

Group: Freebooterz
Posts: 2,846
Joined: 11-July 03
From: melbourne, australia
Member No.: 45



Hmm well I just bought some of the new paints including the liquid green stuff ( which is bloody awesome! ). The first paint I tried was a hashut copper over tin bitz.. And it was terrible lol hopefully the rest turn out alright.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agatheron
post Apr 9 2012, 11:00 AM
Post #8


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



The culprit there may be the tin bitz. I have long found that stuff doesn't stick to tin bitz well. Try the metallic bases. smilingOrk.gif


--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Badfang Brassaxe
post Apr 9 2012, 03:22 PM
Post #9


Explosive Kranium


Group: Boyz
Posts: 626
Joined: 22-January 09
Member No.: 9,593



Cheers for the review Aga, it's good of you to take the time thumbs.gif

QUOTE (Agatheron @ Apr 9 2012, 12:43 AM) *
With the spray gun, it also includes how to create camo schemes using the Spray gun.

Hairspray?
The reason I'm asking is 'coz I tried it last week on my Slapshootaz (light isn't brilliant but it shows up well enough on my PC)
Attached Image

As someone who is basically bone idle, I'm very impressed with the result (especially for the effort it took biggrin2.gif )
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agatheron
post Apr 9 2012, 09:53 PM
Post #10


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



Nope... not hairspray... different technique, different book. When I say "Spray Gun" I mean GW's base-end single-action airbrush with Badger fittings that is shaped like a hand flamer. I have it, but I tend to use my own airbrush as it gives me better control...


--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Shadey
post Apr 9 2012, 11:20 PM
Post #11


telescoping arm


Group: Boyz
Posts: 505
Joined: 5-May 06
Member No.: 2,474



I don't suppose there was any indication of an advanced book in the works? Like in the Forgeworld Masterclass they mentioned they were hoping to do more.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agatheron
post Apr 10 2012, 12:04 AM
Post #12


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



Well... 'eavy Metal Masterclass books come out periodically. They released on recently, but once they build up a library using the new paints, I'm sure we'll see one.

Forgeworld has announced a second "Model Masterclass" book which is coming out soon. I WILL be getting that as well. smilingOrk.gif



--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Killbless
post Apr 10 2012, 04:36 AM
Post #13


Runtherd
Group Icon

Group: Boyz
Posts: 334
Joined: 2-February 10
From: Austraila
Member No.: 11,172



Interesting...

Have you actually had much of a play around with the new paints at all? I had a quick demo in store last week and I was quite impressed.

Book sounds alright, might be something I should look into.

QUOTE
Forgeworld has announced a second "Model Masterclass" book which is coming out soon. I WILL be getting that as well. smilingOrk.gif


This makes me very happy, the first book was amazing.


--------------------
"Natural progression I guess; Wartrakktor, Wartrukk, Battlewagon..." - Thoume on the evolution of Ork vehicles

'It is considered a great breach of protocol to open fire upon a challenger in a race such as this, though truth be told Orks have never cared that much about protocol' - Ork Codex

"In the end the towing stompa literally bristles with weaponry from across the galaxy. Sometimes the gunz are even pointing in the right direction!" - Imperial Armour 8 on Deff Arsenals
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Agatheron
post Apr 10 2012, 10:42 AM
Post #14


Blue Thunda Ace
Group Icon

Group: Nobz
Posts: 6,315
Joined: 6-July 03
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Member No.: 32



QUOTE (Killbless @ Apr 10 2012, 03:36 AM) *
Interesting...

Have you actually had much of a play around with the new paints at all? I had a quick demo in store last week and I was quite impressed. .


I have about 25 pots from the new line, including about 8 base, 10 Layer, 4 shade, 1 texture, 1 technical, 1 drybrush. I like them. There have been some negative reviews, including one YouTube video that savages them pretty badly. However, what I found infuriating about the video is that the guy seemed to miss the point of purpose-brewed paint. I also looked I how he applied the paints on his test strip, and he tended to press the new paints harder on the palette, artificially making them appear thinner than they really are.

When I mean purpose built paint is that the layer paints are purpose built for highlights, which means they are supposed to be translucent. The bases cover very well, and are brighter than the foundation line. Not only that, they really take paints brushed over them very well, which wasn't always the case. I've mentioned my comparison with tin bitz and Balthazar gold elsewhere, in that shining gold goes over the balthazar far better than the tin bitz.

I did post a thread on the paints in the Tekneeks forum, but if anyone has experience of the new paints, we may as well post them here.


--------------------
______Agatheron \_______
--Remember, long, uncontrolled bursts,
and indiscriminate target selection.
____________________________/


http://chaplainsbrush.wordpress.com/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version |  Time is now: 19th April 2014 - 03:03 PM